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Old Sep 16th 2014, 12:40 PM   #16
 
  Feb 2011
  Pierre SD


It's simple, the DNR people want every hunter to check their hunter harvested deer to see if they have it, as soon as they find it, they better quarantine whatever farm they find it on in the wild. Watch the private land hunting lock up at that point!!! It would make exactly the same sense as*throwing a quarantine on*the red deer farm with 1 positive animal..
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Old Sep 16th 2014, 01:16 PM   #17
 jerrilee cave's Avatar
 
  Feb 2013
  Markleville IN
We should all demand a 30+ mile radius or a county buffer. That's how far they might have traveled. And nobody can sell crops from that radius!
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Old Sep 16th 2014, 07:53 PM   #18
 jerrilee cave's Avatar
 
  Feb 2013
  Markleville IN




Deer dispersal research and chronic wasting disease


March 15, 2013

.. ..















UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Between 2001 and 2005, when Duane Diefenbach was studying the dispersal of young white-tailed deer, he had no idea the research would prove useful in trying to contain an outbreak of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in the Keystone State.


By 2008, when the results of the collaborative research project conducted by Penn State, the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the U.S. Geological Survey were published in an issue of Behavioral Ecology, it occurred to him that his work might have epidemiological implications.


The study, which involved 500 radio-collared deer from Centre and Armstrong counties that ended up in 10 other surrounding counties, was part of the Game Commission's evaluation of changes to the state's deer population resulting from antler restrictions aimed at allowing male deer to grow older.


The research took place before CWD showed up in New York, West Virginia and Maryland. The disease, which always is fatal to deer and elk, has persisted in the West for more than three decades. Wildlife biologists knew the malady slowly was marching east, but they had not yet been faced with the reality it had arrived in Pennsylvania.


Recently the Game Commission announced that brain-tissue tests conducted on wild Pennsylvania deer taken by hunters last fall revealed that three were infected with CWD. Those animals were killed in Bedford and Blair counties.


Last fall, tests revealed that two captive deer at a private game farm in Adams County had CWD. So, state wildlife officials now are focused on keeping the disease from spreading into other southern counties and to the Northern Tier.


In his four-year study, Diefenbach, adjunct associate professor of wildlife ecology in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences and leader of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, documented deer dispersal behavior that provides insight into how far and how fast CWD could spread among wild deer.


"We learned that 70 percent of yearling males will disperse, and the average dispersal is six to seven miles," he said. "Depending on the amount of forest on the landscape, those yearling males may go just a mile or as far as 30 miles."


In Pennsylvania, few young female deer disperse, Diefenbach noted, but when they do, they usually go farther than the males -- some much farther.


"On average, females go about 12 miles, but their behavior is different from males," he said. "When males disperse, they go in one direction and are finished moving in 12 to 24 hours. When females disperse, they engage in strange, seemingly random movements -- wandering over the landscape and often changing directions.


"Their movement can take weeks or months, and we don't know what is driving them to disperse. It is unexpected, peculiar behavior."


Diefenbach said one female in Indiana County went well over 100 miles but ended up only 30 miles from where she was born. "And we documented other females that made similar movements."


Why all of this is important, he explained, is it gives deer managers like Game Commission biologists a solid idea how far CWD-causing prions might be carried by free-ranging deer.


Now, researchers at Penn State are using results from Diefenbach's study to model how and where the disease will spread in Pennsylvania.


David Walter, adjunct associate professor of wildlife ecology and assistant leader of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and Tyler Evans, a master's degree candidate in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from Salem, Ohio, are collaborating with the Game Commission to conduct the research.


Walter is no stranger to chronic wasting disease -- he studied its spread in the endemic region (where CWD originated) in western Nebraska, Colorado and Wyoming.


"We know now how deer move on the landscape, so we hope Dr. Walter's research will help us make better predictions about how CWD will spread," Diefenbach said. "So far, most research has simply observed retrospectively where the disease shows up over time, but it is much more difficult to predict the future movement of disease. Our research defining how deer actually travel will make that much more possible."


Scientists know that the disease spreads through the combination of an animal moving and either interacting directly with another animal, or contracting it indirectly through the environment. Diefenbach's research showed that deer in Pennsylvania are much more likely to disperse parallel to ridges than perpendicular to them. And larger, busy roads and rivers influence the direction they disperse and also where they stop.


"We know a deer has to go from one location to another to transmit the disease. But when the disease pops up in a new location, does that represent the fact that one animal moved there, or is there some progression of infected animals -- and we just happened to detect one?"


Diefenbach's research showed that in forested landscapes, deer did not disperse as far. So in areas with fragmented forest interspersed with fields and development, deer likely will move farther. Hence CWD would be expected to spread more quickly.


"Northcentral Pennsylvania is 90 percent forest, but we have other areas that are less than 30 percent forest -- there is a huge variability in the amount of forest on the landscape," he said.


"So, in parts of the state with less forest, the Game Commission may have to consider disease-management areas that are larger, and it also has implications on sampling efforts to try to get a handle on the prevalence of the disease."


http://news.psu.edu/story/268847/201...asting-disease
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 04:14 AM   #19
 
  Nov 2010
  Lanesboro, Minnesota


Jerrilee, *I was told there is going to be a report released in January, done in North Dakota, that collared 75 deer and released them back in the same zone. *These deer travel movements were documented where does were recorded moving 200 miles, and bucks moving 300 miles. *This is going to blow holes in states wanting to close borders to us. *These deer do not respect borders. *There is more CWD moving around by the wild deer herd than conservation will admit. *The DNR needs to test at 100% for several years, to really see the situation they are in. *Instead of sticking their heads in the sand, and testing at 1/2 of 1%. *I am tired of seeing these deer farms being used as "canaries in the coal mine". *They use us to find these zones, then blame us for causing the CWD in that zone. *Kind of like blaming the canary for the methane build-up in the coal mine isn't it?
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 06:26 AM   #20
 
  Jul 2014
  Waveland, Misissippi


GO you hit another nail on the head, Deer out west do a lot of migrating from one range to another every year vs* some of our eastern and southern herds. Same for Elk. Its up to us to stay on top and help the general*public and sportsman get the real facts and whole story vs a single sided version.
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 06:43 AM   #21
 Four Seasons Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Oct 2009
  upstate ny

Cervid: Whitetail Deer
I had my yearly inventory Monday and kinda got into it with my state vet about CWD and they say that by keeping the borders closed to Whitetails it will keep CWD out of Ny! I told her that I could have a very good chance of bringing it in to alot of farms just by buying my winter hay! She was clueless to the fact that the prions could be moved by feed ?? Really, I mean she really told me I was full of it!
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 07:12 AM   #22
 
  Jul 2014
  Waveland, Misissippi


Tell ya what , Pm me her contact number and I will be happy to call he and give her factual based info and better educate her on transmission vectors. Im serious . Pm me their contact info and be happy to help you out. It shows how uneducated some of these people are and not given proper info or training.* Sounds like the the same chick that was over captive program in NC, Straight out of school, Got hired by the state WRC and had no experience in any form of captive management or education* and went around wit a little bull dog attitude and made no friends or got any respect from people in the captive arena.* Agai folks updated and proper education is what these state guys lack. Lets get them up to speed with the truth and positive information to better try and establish a better working relationship if possible .As long as their open to reason and suggestion.
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 07:25 AM   #23
 jerrilee cave's Avatar
 
  Feb 2013
  Markleville IN
I'm always quizzing our head of cervid with the board of health... if she has read this our that....If she hasn't ...I send it to her and she sends me articles too
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 07:27 AM   #24
 jerrilee cave's Avatar
 
  Feb 2013
  Markleville IN
If at all possible I think it is important to have a GOOD RELATIONSHIP with your state people...If possible.... We want the ag and board of health on our side...
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 07:53 AM   #25
 
  Jul 2014
  Waveland, Misissippi


It is very important for any involved in the industry to develop good open dialect and working relations with the DOA . In the past that has been one of the problems that persisted in different states was a lack of open communication.
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Old Sep 17th 2014, 09:13 AM   #26
 Four Seasons Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Oct 2009
  upstate ny

Cervid: Whitetail Deer
Oh we are on great terms and belirve it or not this lady was the lady that did the testing on the first case of CWD in Ny. I just asked her the other day.. Why is it I can bring other vectors of CWD into the state from proven carriers but not deer from 10 years plus tested negitive deer herds from other states! She says she has seen nothing of alfalfa and such and has heard nothing of what Canada is thinking about doing! That's the problem. Our positives never get out znd all the negitives do and runs our asses over! Untill we have a couple active court cases going in each state during these states then we will get no where but depopulated! Maybe there should be a donation action in each state supported by every state to foot the bill to start these suits? Man it just burns me!!
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Old May 18th 2021, 12:51 AM   #27
 
  May 2021
  Canada
This is my kingdom come estate planning boise
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