Deer Farmer

Go Back   Deer Farmer > Deer Farming Forum > Deer Breeding

Deer Breeding Deer Breeding and Genetics Forum - breeding (natural and AI), genetics, animal husbandry, bottle raising fawns and calves, weaning, care of pregnant females, etc.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes

Old May 7th 2015, 04:14 AM   #16
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA


What is the general process of AI? how challenging is it? can a beginner do it?
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 10:15 AM   #17
 IndependenceRanch's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Edgar, WI

Cervid: deer
AI is really not brain surgery. Yes you need to do things a certain way, but most folks can do it if they learn how correctly. That said, again depending on where your farm is getting someone to do your deer may not be hard at all. If your way out of the way it could be more difficult. By these days there are a lot of folks doing AI. They may not all be great at it, but they can still do it.

Your asking good questions and open to taking advice from folks on here so keep doing it. You have much to learn grasshopper. LOL
IndependenceRanch is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 10:33 AM   #18
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA


Im just tryign to learn as much as I possibly can! I have general plans but nothign concrete.. I would like to have as big and as typical as possible and to have a very nice clean set up with room for growth and thats about as far as my plan goes. I know you can never "expect" anything in this industry but about how many fawns per doe do you "expect"? Or what is the average? assuming a healthy herd and low stress
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 10:46 AM   #19
 IndependenceRanch's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Edgar, WI

Cervid: deer
If I had to put a number to it I would say about 1.8 fawns per doe. If you do AI that number can increase to 2 or more. Using the meds involved with AI tends to increase the fawns born. At least that has been my experience.
IndependenceRanch is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 01:10 PM   #20
 
  Nov 2013
  Mission MN
When you are ready I can help you with bred does. We have a few good AI techs up here that are pretty good too! Lots of good semen floating around real reasonable. Breeder bucks are still a bit pricey by comparison but we cycle 3 or 4 out of here every year. We really like helping people improve their genetics . Our interest is greedy as we like to buy the stockers for our preserve.

Our genetics are very typical , heavy and wide with 2 year olds SCI grossing as high as 288 . We don't give them names and don't flash a lot of pics around. We have been doing this since 1979 and have seen a lot of deer people come and go. We now try and grow what our hunters want because that's what pays the bills.
Arrowed1 is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 01:37 PM   #21
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA
Where are you located at?
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 01:37 PM   #22
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA
I was using 2 for easy math which makes 1 doe and 1 buck
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 02:15 PM   #23
 zmcgill's Avatar
 
  Sep 2009
  Utica, PA Venango Co.
I agree wth all the previous advice mentioned. I like a flexible plan. You will come across some unforeseen hurdles, and need to readjust along the way.
zmcgill is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 04:09 PM   #24
 Wild Rivers Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Northeast Wisconsin

Cervid: Deer Farming


You can get good genetics very reasonably.* If you can grow bucks that score from 170 - 200 when they are two years old, you will be able to sell them.* This will cover your feed bills and hopefully make you a little money.* If you buy bred does to start, you will have a variety of genetics right off the bat.* You can keep mixing it up for a lot of years before you need to go out and get more.* You just need a couple pens so you can divide your group - one year breed one group to a certain buck and then switch it up the next.* Once you have your own yearling bucks you can use those to breed, then sell them the next year and use some of your next crop of yearlings - etc.* You aren't doing a lot of inbreeding then.* Line breeding can work but if you are just getting started you may want to do something like above.*


*


Depending on where you are located, laws for selling venison vary and can be overbearing, making it not worth the effort, or even illegal.
Wild Rivers Whitetails is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 05:02 PM   #25
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA
But wouldn't I be breeding my yearly bucks to their mothers? Isn't that direct inbreeding? That's the part in confused on... Would I start with bred does then get a breeder buck too?
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 06:35 PM   #26
 Padencreek's Avatar
 
  May 2011
  Linesville, PA


Let's say you got 2 bred does and each had a buck and a doe.* The following year you* could breed the buck from*one doe to the other, or the buck from one doe to the doe fawn from another, etc.* I think that was the point Wild Rivers was trying to make.


*


As far as average fawns I would say two.* Normally, if a doe fawn gets bred at like 5 months she will only have 1 but it varies.* Usually, my mature does have two but sometimes you can get trips.


*


The basics of AI*are as follows:* there are two options, conventional and Laparoscopic (LAP AI).* With conventional you usually put a whole semen straw into the doe to breed it but you can learn to do it yourself so you could save some money* that way.* However, with Lap AI, a vet comes to your farm and performs a laparoscopic*procedure to inseminate your doe which costs about $300 per deer.* One big advantage of Lap AI is you can have the vet split the straw 2,3, and sometimes 4 times so if you paid $1000 for a straw and put it in 3 doe, you would have $1900 wrapped up in that breeding.


*


Regardless of the options there are some things you have to do to get the does to cycle at the precise time of insemination but you can learn those details later.*


*


*


You have a lot of good questions and you're on the right track.
Padencreek is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 06:36 PM   #27
 Four Seasons Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Oct 2009
  upstate ny

Cervid: Whitetail Deer
MnMoose1022721431046956



But wouldn't I be breeding my yearly bucks to their mothers? Isn't that direct inbreeding? That's the part in confused on... Would I start with bred does then get a breeder buck too?




Thats why you have different pens. To change things out. Its pretty simple really. Dont let them be together and they wont inbreed. How you do that is you choice. If you have 2 does bred to 2 different bucks then you have two different breeding. When they have sons and daughters you mix them up and let them have at it.
Four Seasons Whitetails is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 06:49 PM   #28
 
  May 2015
  Alexandria, MN USA
Padencreek1022771431052521


Let's say you got 2 bred does and each had a buck and a doe. The following year you could breed the buck from one doe to the other, or the buck from one doe to the doe fawn from another, etc. I think that was the point Wild Rivers was trying to make.


As far as average fawns I would say two. Normally, if a doe fawn gets bred at like 5 months she will only have 1 but it varies. Usually, my mature does have two but sometimes you can get trips.


The basics of AI are as follows: there are two options, conventional and Laparoscopic (LAP AI). With conventional you usually put a whole semen straw into the doe to breed it but you can learn to do it yourself so you could save some money that way. However, with Lap AI, a vet comes to your farm and performs a laparoscopic procedure to inseminate your doe which costs about $300 per deer. One big advantage of Lap AI is you can have the vet split the straw 2,3, and sometimes 4 times so if you paid $1000 for a straw and put it in 3 doe, you would have $1900 wrapped up in that breeding.


Regardless of the options there are some things you have to do to get the does to cycle at the precise time of insemination but you can learn those details later.



You have a lot of good questions and you're on the right track.


Would you miss a year of fawns or would you AI the first year?
MnMoose is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 06:53 PM   #29
 Padencreek's Avatar
 
  May 2011
  Linesville, PA


I would probably start with 1 or 2 bred does to start*so you have a full year to learn about AI and decide what genetics you want to use the following year.
Padencreek is offline  
Old May 7th 2015, 07:06 PM   #30
 zmcgill's Avatar
 
  Sep 2009
  Utica, PA Venango Co.
Another scenario would be to buy two bred doe. Make arrangements to leave them where you bought them until after the next breeding season, and either have them ai'd or live bred on the already established farm.
zmcgill is offline  
Reply

  Deer Farmer > Deer Farming Forum > Deer Breeding

Tags
breeding, rotation, stock



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
In stock meds warnerswhitetails Deer Health 6 Sep 7th 2019 08:29 PM
mule deer breeding stock kass7111 Deer Breeding 1 Aug 27th 2014 10:41 AM
Monster Elk Stock stevefriend Deer Breeding 4 Mar 15th 2012 06:26 AM
HSUS Uses Stock Purchases as Weapon Russell Cervid Industry 2 May 1st 2010 07:49 AM
Stock Trailer acutting Deer Farm Production 8 Jan 12th 2010 05:14 AM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed