Deer Farmer

Go Back   Deer Farmer > Deer Farming Forum > Deer Breeding

Deer Breeding Deer Breeding and Genetics Forum - breeding (natural and AI), genetics, animal husbandry, bottle raising fawns and calves, weaning, care of pregnant females, etc.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes

Old Oct 13th 2014, 11:42 AM   #1
 Bell's Avatar
 
  Apr 2014
  Greensburg, IN
Several years ago this was something done to try and beat the Jones's by getting offspring first from a particular sire. Getting fawns bred was a way that would make you one of the first to have a cross or offspring from a hyped bloodline. Today as a producer I am wondering if there isn't a different motivation to get them bred. That would be the cost of upkeep of each animal. If most of a farms doe fawns could breed they would potentially put a son on the ground that could be sold for a profit sooner. I know fawns over 70lbs at thanksgiving can be cidr-ed and bred consistently. The best method we found in the past was to mix the pmsg then freeze it in individual syringes. This enables individual deer to be synchronized on different days which intern makes getting them all pasture bred much more likely by a buck fawn or yearling buck. I wonder if this isn't an option that is worth the effort considering the cost we face to raise our animals vs. the prices we are now being offered by some preserves.
Bell is offline  
Old Oct 13th 2014, 06:58 PM   #2
 
  Dec 2013
  Minnesota


Jonathan,


You say 70lbs by thanksgiving, I am wondering when you would be putting cidr's in then? I have a couple large doe fawns that I am sure will be over 70 lbs by thanksgiving (one is 63lbs as of oct 1st)*


I was thinking she would breed if I through her in with the mature does but we usually try to pull the breeder by Jan 1st.*


Do they usually have a single? how much pmsg do you give? i wouldn't want them to have twins


*


Thanks


Tom
tom'sdream is offline  
Old Oct 13th 2014, 08:03 PM   #3
 Bell's Avatar
 
  Apr 2014
  Greensburg, IN
I wouldn't cidr them before thanksgiving. They usually will not stand and support a mature breeder buck. Another buck fawn with with hard antler bone showing or a yearling buck would be best. I wouldn't give fawns synchronized for pasture breeding more than .25-.50 cc of foligon. I have only had singles born from fawns. If they breed as fawns they will almost always have twins or trips as yearlings. I am not sure if it is good to put these fawns through this so young or if it is even worthwhile to pursue. I hope others will chime in this discussion.
Bell is offline  
Old Oct 14th 2014, 01:20 PM   #4
 
  Oct 2012
  Ohio


I put my biggest buck fawn in with my doe fawns last season so i could "get a head start" with a doe. I will admit i was a nervous wreck. She just looked so big when she neared birthing. II HATED IT and wished i hadn't bred her. I will never do it again. I got my head start with her but honestly HATED the way i felt every time i looked at her. I wasn't excited like i was seeing the adult doe ready to drop
D&T Whitetails is offline  
Old Oct 14th 2014, 04:06 PM   #5
 Whitetail Sanctuary's Avatar
 
  May 2009
  Chillicothe, Missouri


Rick, I know how you felt! I used ti Cidr my biggest doe fawns as well..............One year we had an exceptionaly large fawn 97lb at Dec 1st we synchronized her and gave .25 cc of Pmsg left her in with the Breeder buck 2 weeks after we saw her breed. I remember my wifes disgust with me when she saw her "Bottle fed Baby" get mounted by a 350lb *Buck and then she had Triplet buck fawns and all survived the birthing experience but we would after many many long heart ache experiences we lost all 3 bucks!


*


I doubt i will ever want repeat the experience!


*


Best of Luck!
Whitetail Sanctuary is offline  
Old Oct 14th 2014, 05:00 PM   #6
 Bell's Avatar
 
  Apr 2014
  Greensburg, IN
Wayne

The details in that story are terrible but they are educational and helpful info. In the past I know that auction companies would allow sellers to consign fawns that would be potently born from fawns while the buyer would not be privy to the info.

Thanks
Bell is offline  
Old Oct 15th 2014, 06:04 AM   #7
 
  Apr 2009
  Williamsport, PA


We had 50% of our fawns breed last year. No CIDRS, no pmsg. Fawns were here by the first week of July. Though body size is a big factor in breeding fawns maturity is the key. Some lines mature faster than others. We have had a few sets of twins over the years out of fawns. We rarely have issues with them fawning.
Josh is offline  
Old Oct 15th 2014, 07:19 AM   #8
 Bell's Avatar
 
  Apr 2014
  Greensburg, IN
Josh

Were your fawns that were naturally bred born before May 10? If so, was their earlier birth the result of synchronization of their dams? I have noticed the fawns born that are oldest tend to be the one that get bred. What age was the buck that naturally bred your fawns? It stands to reason that having early born fawns is important if naturally breeding is the goal. They will be larger and more mature in the fall. The method to get them would be to synchronize adults so that they fawn the first of May. I think doe that are over 3 years old would be the ones to back cycles up on. Anyone else's experiences with this would be enlightening whether good or bad.

Thanks for the input already!
Bell is offline  
Old Oct 15th 2014, 02:48 PM   #9
 
  Oct 2012
  Ohio


Wayne...i didn't expand my comments last night but i will tonight...My buck fawn bred that doe fawn and an adult doe, He was a MONSTER..HUGE buck fawn...he was as big as the does by winter and in the spring he was as big as my 2yr old bucks...The 2 does dropped 3 buck fawns. the fawn from the doe fawn was the biggest of all 3 and he died. One of the fawns from the adult doe died and the other one is still here BUT he is TINY. He was born July 3rd but he is still really small. I have to wonder if the losses were from breeding fawns..those were my ONLY losses so i* REALLY HAVE TO WONDER
D&T Whitetails is offline  
Old Oct 15th 2014, 06:27 PM   #10
 
  Apr 2009
  Williamsport, PA
Bell986881413386342



Josh

Were your fawns that were naturally bred born before May 10? If so, was their earlier birth the result of synchronization of their dams? I have noticed the fawns born that are oldest tend to be the one that get bred. What age was the buck that naturally bred your fawns? It stands to reason that having early born fawns is important if naturally breeding is the goal. They will be larger and more mature in the fall. The method to get them would be to synchronize adults so that they fawn the first of May. I think doe that are over 3 years old would be the ones to back cycles up on. Anyone else's experiences with this would be enlightening whether good or bad.

Thanks for the input already!




I think all the does were born after May 10th. The buck that bred the fawns was Midnight Ranger...He was seven years old last year and not a small deer. He just walks over top of them
Josh is offline  
Old Oct 16th 2014, 04:30 AM   #11
 
  Oct 2012
  Ohio
Lol josh...funny stuff...thanks for the laugh...although prolly true
D&T Whitetails is offline  
Reply

  Deer Farmer > Deer Farming Forum > Deer Breeding

Tags
breeding, fawns, pasture, synchronizing



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Breeding doe fawns Rockinr Deer Breeding 10 Jan 5th 2014 04:18 PM
separating fawns before breeding mulberry river whitetails Deer Breeding 12 Oct 23rd 2013 04:23 AM
Doe fawns still breeding Charlie blaschko Deer Breeding 5 Jan 20th 2013 06:55 PM
Pasture grass champs01 Deer Farm Production 2 Jan 8th 2011 06:25 PM
Breeding Fawns??? richie0033 Deer Breeding 11 Jul 25th 2009 01:19 AM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed