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Old Sep 19th 2011, 04:56 AM   #1
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
I do not speak from much experience here, but the 2 confirmed cases of antler infection in my bucks this year started with exactly the same symtoms. And it is these symptoms that I want to bring to light so others can be on the lookout for them in the future. Each one of my bucks started by showing a loss of appetite and quit showing up when the rest of the deer did at feeding time. The next physical signs they both showed was the ''fuzzies''- (their hair not laying down, hair standing up as if they have goose bumps). They also wagged their tail excessively, and I mean excessively. And they both had that ''distant look'' in their eyes.

I know that these symptoms I have described are/can be indicative of sick deer that are sick for other reasons other than an antler infection, but if we keep an extra careful eye out on our antlered deer during late summer, which seems to be prime time, maybe we can catch more of them in time and save them. By 'keeping an extra careful eye' I mean- look for the telltale signs mentioned above, and count them every day to make sure they are all there. And if they're not there, go look for them and see what's going on and don't wait till tomorrow. I count them often, but not everyday. But I can tell you that next fall, especially in August, and especially the last 2 weeks in August, I will count EVERY day. As I look back into the past, I believe that some of my buck deaths that I have experienced in the month of August have more than likely been do to antler infections. I have heard that they can die very quickly, and that fact lines up with why I never noticed these bucks sick prior to their August's deaths. I would come down to the pen and there they would be laying...dead. I'd be like ''What happened to him??!! And then I'd remember consciously seeing them not long before finding them dead and be blown away.

I'm sure there are others out there with more experience with antler infections that will hopefully add to this thread. God Bless All!
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Old Sep 19th 2011, 11:37 AM   #2
 Wild Rivers Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Northeast Wisconsin

Cervid: Deer Farming
What we have found is that you really have to keep an eye on the antlers. If you see a tear or an area that looks black, those are prime signs of a possible antler infection. Some nontypicals have a lot of points and it is harder to see on them, but if they are looking sickly in August that is a prime target. The quicker you can get to them the better. We had a whole segment of our TV show that showed up close and personal what it looks like and what to do about it. Very soon we will have season #1, all 13 episodes available for purchase. We'll keep you posted on that.
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Old Sep 19th 2011, 04:37 PM   #3
 Predator3's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Defiance, MO

Cervid: Whitetails
Mark, sorry for your loss. We have lost bucks to antler infections our selves. One more sign is to look at them very close, you will see their head quivering ever so slightly. Unfortunately it only seems to effect the big ones. I believe it is because there is enough surface area of antler that their natural immune system can't keep up. Mark the symptoms you listed where same as ours.
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Old Sep 19th 2011, 05:29 PM   #4
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
Quote:
Originally Posted by Predator3
Mark, sorry for your loss. We have lost bucks to antler infections our selves. One more sign is to look at them very close, you will see their head quivering ever so slightly. Unfortunately it only seems to effect the big ones. I believe it is because there is enough surface area of antler that their natural immune system can't keep up. Mark the symptoms you listed where same as ours.
Appreciate your compassion Paul, but we did not lose those 2 bucks. It was touch and go on the first one(one of the biggest yearlings we've ever produced of course), but just tonight I have determined he is very likely gonna make it. The infection had moved down into his eye and his eye looked like it had or was going to explode, and tonight for the 1st time that look started to retract, thank God!!! And he is aggressively eating his bread, leaves, and grain(almost) like he did prior to his infection. The other buck we either caught earlier, wasn't as severe of an infection, or got better quicker because we incorporated penicillin and/or excenel right off the bat, but none the less, he is good to go and got good to go much quicker. Thanks for your input Paul and Gary. Awareness is paramount to everyone's deer's health and well being.
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Old Sep 20th 2011, 03:29 PM   #5
 
  Aug 2010
  Illinois
Mark: Here's an interesting antler infectioon story I found on-line which you might find applicable.



I'm so glad they're doing better- but be careful, you might have to continue to treat for a while...



http://thedeermancharlesblack.blogsp...itetailed.html
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Old Sep 27th 2011, 11:07 AM   #6
 
  Sep 2011
  Bemidji, MN
Are Fallow deer prone to antler infection is it a whitetail thing?
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