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Old Jun 5th 2011, 04:50 AM   #1
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
In the past, I have seen elongated hooves occassionally before, and they seem to eventually just break off. Other than just the confinement, I have heard that too high of a protein content is responsible for these extra long hooves. I feed 16% grain and a 22% hay. If it is indeed caused by ''too'' high protein, then I would be glad to cut my protein down on the grain just for cost sake. If I can cut down on my protein and still maintain good health and growth, then great. What do ya think? Any input or opinions are appreciated and welcomed. Mark
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Old Jun 5th 2011, 05:30 AM   #2
 
  Apr 2009
  Chambersburg, Pa
Do you have rocks (3-4s) around your feeders?
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Old Jun 5th 2011, 05:52 AM   #3
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
No rocks Bruce.
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Old Jun 5th 2011, 06:50 AM   #4
 
  Dec 2010
  the beautiful farm country of western NY
I have #4 stone around perimeters and stone walls all throughout my pens. Now and then, certain bucks seem to grow the accessive hooves, usually in front as the hind hoof abraids against the back of the fronts while walking. I personally attribute the extra growth to what we are doing...hopefully feeding high test food for accessive antler growth. Its not all of my bucks either, just the odd individual, and I have not seen a doe that way. Things that make you go "hmmm".
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Old Jun 5th 2011, 07:49 AM   #5
 Wild Rivers Whitetails's Avatar
 
  Apr 2009
  Northeast Wisconsin

Cervid: Deer Farming
We see it once in a while especially in the spring. During the winter months the deer aren't as active and with all the snow they don't have an opportunity to wear down their hooves naturally.
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Old Jun 5th 2011, 02:58 PM   #6
 
  Aug 2010
  Illinois
We've had a lot of rain in IL and it's possible that the ground in your pens is just too soft to wear the hooves down through normal activity.



Or are those deer particularly lazy ones??? hehe.
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Old Jun 8th 2011, 10:47 AM   #7
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
Maybe all the rain we are having does weigh in, but I'm on sand so I don't know. Now we got all this crazy heat. don't know where you are at in Illinois Lanasvet, but since I'm in the north its probly a safe bet you are south of me somewhere enduring more heat than I. The only good thing from all this heat, if there is such a thing, is my grain bill is decreased. My deer, throughout the herd, eat a solid 30% less when it's real hot like this. Crazy crazy weather...93 today - 73 tomorrow...it's been one extreme to the other...alot!
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Old Jun 8th 2011, 02:17 PM   #8
 
  Aug 2010
  Illinois
Extremely hot here not too far from The city... appetite has decreased a bit... my own... not so much.
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Old Jun 9th 2011, 07:40 AM   #9
 
  Sep 2009
  Northern, Minnesota
Mark

Go to my web page Deer Health and there is a little statement there. It may help
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Old Jun 9th 2011, 11:31 AM   #10
 
  Dec 2010
  the beautiful farm country of western NY
Respectfully, I dont see how stone (abrasive and wear) and soft footing (snow or mud)explains excessive hoof growth when its not all the animals, olr just a buck but not does, over a 20 year experience.
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Old Jun 10th 2011, 04:02 AM   #11
 
  Aug 2010
  Illinois
My doe had excessively long hooves all winter (while she was indoors recovering from a broken leg) until she got outside this spring. I had to trim them twice this past winter. Now they are perfect, now that she's outside and running/jumping/skipping around.
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Old Jun 10th 2011, 07:39 AM   #12
 
  Dec 2010
  the beautiful farm country of western NY
Yes in that instance they would grow without the use of everyday abrasive contact. Dew claws will too, although I have never trimmed them, just hooves on an injured deer. These deer just keep teaching us more every day.
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Old Jun 12th 2011, 04:09 PM   #13
 
  Feb 2011
  Pierre SD
I know in cattle if they get too much corn or grain too fast it will founder them (growing long toes). When we start our cattle in the feedlot on a grain you want to take several weeks adding a little more every few days to get them onto a full grain fattening ration to avoid the foot problems. It affects some animals in different ways, some will founder and some won't on the same amount of grain.
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Old Jul 8th 2015, 10:45 AM   #14
 Bell's Avatar
 
  Apr 2014
  Greensburg, IN
http://m.ktuu.com/news/sleigh-hoof-a...e-pic/34040844
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Old Jul 8th 2015, 06:10 PM   #15
 
  Jul 2009


elongated hooves are also a sign of being an EHD survivor, seen it several times.*
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