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Old Jan 16th 2012, 09:54 AM   #1
 
  Dec 2011
  Rolla, MO
What's your favorite recipe for venison
deercrazy61 is offline  
Old Jan 16th 2012, 06:40 PM   #2
 
  Apr 2009
  Sullivan,MO 63080
This is very simple but there is nothing better if you like garlic. Take a section of loin slice down the middle two thirds deep. Take some whole garlic cloves and saute them in butter till just tender. Then layer the cut in the middle of the loin with the garlic cloves and season the loin with your favorite seasoning. Then wrap the whole loin with thin sliced bacon and cook on a hot grill till medium rare. If it is an older deer you can coat with non-seasoned meat tenderizer overnight or at least 6 hrs before cooking. Their is nothing better. I use all or loins this way, but like I said you must like garlic. If not you could maybe substitute small onions or shallots instead.
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Old Jan 19th 2012, 03:32 PM   #3
 
  May 2010
  nj
Quote:
Originally Posted by wthollow
This is very simple but there is nothing better if you like garlic. Take a section of loin slice down the middle two thirds deep. Take some whole garlic cloves and saute them in butter till just tender. Then layer the cut in the middle of the loin with the garlic cloves and season the loin with your favorite seasoning. Then wrap the whole loin with thin sliced bacon and cook on a hot grill till medium rare. If it is an older deer you can coat with non-seasoned meat tenderizer overnight or at least 6 hrs before cooking. Their is nothing better. I use all or loins this way, but like I said you must like garlic. If not you could maybe substitute small onions or shallots instead.


ummmmm, sounds great,
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Old Feb 8th 2012, 06:55 AM   #4
 
  May 2009
  Northwest Illinois
Venison Roast - Cut your meat into sizes from golf ball to tennis ball. Yes you could use ''slab'' form if you are using hindquarter or something, but I would make it 2 to no more than 3 inches thick. Roll them each thoroughly in flour and fry/brown them in butter, and don't be stingy with the butter. Might even have to add more butter when your flip the pieces, I always do. Season at this time. I use garlic salt and black pepper on all my venison. And I season both sides on a roast and am generous with my seasonong as well. Much of it cooks away and dilutes in the roasting process.

After you brown the meat, put it in whatever you will be roasting in and add Cambell's cream of chicken&mushroom soup. Add enough to go under, just over, around and through. I add only one can of water per 2 cans of soup. Add also the remaining drippings from the pan you fried the meat in.

I rarely do a roast that I don't add potatoes, so put your spuds in.

If you are using a roaster pan without a lid, simply cover it with aluminum foil and poke 4 holes in the foil with a tooth pick.

The temperature you set depends on how long you want or need to cook it. To insure extreme tenderness, I would recommend a minimum of 3 hours or as much as 5 to 6 hours. Make the time work for you. If you have to work with 3 hours, then I would suggest 325-350 degrees.

If you want to work with 5 or 6 hours, then 250 or so. 225 if you aren't available to check periodically on it's moisture - 250-275 if you are. If your losing moisture simply add some water, but only what you need so as not to dilute too much what the meat is cooking in, or, you could add some more soup to accomplish the same.



I normally roast the neck of the deer, mature bucks in particular, and they turn out tender and extremely tasty. People that don't normally eat/like venison love my roasts.

And what is left over after you pick the meat out of it is flatout awesome gravy without doing a thing to it.

Other than the fantastic palatabilities of this roast, it's great in that you set the leftovers in the fridg and re-heat later for more of ''awesomeness''. Makes great sandwiches as well!!

Try it - you'll like it - I guarantee!
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Old Feb 8th 2012, 07:25 AM   #5
 toddhoeffel's Avatar
 
  Oct 2011
  Columbia City, IN
Venison stroganoff is what I am REQUIRED to bring to family get togethers. I'll take a quart jar of my canned deer meat set off to the side and add in last.



Cook your favorite noodles in a couple cans of beef broth, only cook them until they're about 75% done. I add a can of cream of mushroom, then a whole squeeze bottle of sour cream, and sometimes a packet of store bought stroganoff dry seasoning. Stir together well. Then add the canned meat(juice and all) and bring up to temp and eat either by itsself or over mashed potatos. It's pretty good, and there is never any leftovers (even from the kids and critics!)
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